Virtual Tour of Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health


One of the original schools of public
health in the US, and the first to re-envision the MPH for the 21st century,
Columbia’s Mailman School leads Public Health Education from a Manhattan
neighborhood called Washington Heights. Students come to New York City for a wealth of
resources and opportunities at the school, around the Medical Center, at
Columbia’s other campuses, and through partnerships across the city and in more
than a hundred different countries. Welcome. I’m Jordan Mueller, an MPH
student and your guide. We start our tour with the school’s more than 40 classrooms and
study spaces for everything from a computer based class to a brainstorming
session. Here’s a peek at a few of our labs. The
nearly 40 at the school pioneer research in environmental
toxins, emerging infectious diseases, and more. One of the best things about being a
Mailman student is being part of a diverse intellectual community. Your
peers come from 55 nations and 46 states, and world-class professors will prepare you to be a leader in your field. The Allan Rosenfield building is the heart of our mailman
school. Most of the academic departments, student affairs, and Career Services
call the Rosenfield Building home. As a student you’ll have classes here, study with
friends, meet one-on-one with the professors, and attend talks with leading
academics and influencers in the public and private sectors. Bard Hall is one of
the main entrances to a suite of mixed-use buildings. In Bard and the Haven Towers,
we let loose at the gym mingle with students from across the
medical center, check out the Wellness Center, attend a movie night with your
friends on the roof decks, and if you opt for dorm living, your room will likely be
in one of these high-rises with great views of the Hudson River. I personally
have made a lot of great friends at Bard, from other schools, such as nursing or
medicine Like Bard, the Hammer Building is a
regular stop for peers from all four medical center schools. You’ll find
yourself here frequently, attending classes using one of the study spaces, or
researching a project at the Health Sciences Library. The spaces outside
Hammer act like a medical center commons. From June to November there’s a green
market here on Tuesdays, and everyday you can grab a bite to eat or a book at the
combination bookstore-cafe. We end our tour one block east at the 168th
Street subway station, beside the building where the DeLamar Institute
of Public Health, the precursor to today’s Mailman School, was founded in
1922. From here you can explore the neighborhood, hop on the subway and reach
every corner of New York City, or catch the intercenter campus shuttle and take advantage
of what Columbia’s Morningside and Manhattanville campuses have to offer. If
you’re interested in attending the Mailman School just visit us online and
find the program that’s right for you

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